FREE Crochet Pattern: Hexagon Baby Blanket

I love making baby blankets, and the simpler they are to make, the better. Recently, I made a Hexagon Baby Blanket for someone and I was amazed by how easy it was to make. My idea was this: make a bunch of hexagons, stitch them together, and add a fleece backing. But then, I also added a special bobble border and  found a better way to add fleece than the method I was using before. So today, I’m going to share with you the free pattern and tutorial for my Hexagon Baby Blanket, and show you how I added fleece to the back!

Let’s get started!

Hexagon Baby Blanket

Hexagon Baby Blanket Pattern

Get this pattern as an inexpensive, ad-free PDF that you can print and take with you on the go!

Materials:

  • 8 (7 oz) skeins of worsted weight yarn – 2 of each in the 4 colors
    • I used I Love This Yarn in Greybeard (Color A), Turquoise (Color B), White (Color C) and Aegean Stripe (Color D) for the border.
  • 1.5 yards of no-pill fleece
  • 4.00mm crochet hook (my favorite hooks!)
  • a rotary cutter with skip stitch blades (I got the blades here)
  • tapestry needle for sewing

Pattern:

The first part of the pattern is super easy and that is creating the hexagons. But even though the hexagons are the main “feature” of the hexagon baby blanket, they work up really quickly once you get settled into a rhythm. I’ve written out the pattern for both the hexagons and half- hexagons below, but if you need something more in depth and with a video tutorial, check out my last post!

Full Hexagons:

Make 20 of these in Color A (Greybeard), 16 in Color B (Turquoise) and 16 in Color C (White).

1. Start with a magic loop and secure it with a slip stitch.

2. Chain 2. Work 1 DC into the magic loop. Chain 2 again. Your first chain 2 counts as a DC. * DC 2, chain 2* five more times into the magic loop.

3. You should have 6 sets of DC and 5 chain-2 spaces now. Remove your hook from the work for a second and close the magic loop by tugging the tail end until the circle is closed. Then, slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to finish the round.

crochet-hexagons-3

4. Start the next round with a chain 2 (which will again count as a DC). Work one DC. Then, into the chain-2 space from the previous round, work this pattern: DC, chain 2, DC. This will give you another eyelet on top of the one from the round before.

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*DC 2, [DC, ch 2, DC] into the ch 2 space* all the way around the crochet hexagon. When you get to the end of the round, slip stitch to the top of the chain-2 to finish the round. You should have 4 DCs per side.

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You can make the hexagons larger or smaller than mine as long as they’re all the same size!

5. Chain 2, *DC 3, then work [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain space of the previous round*. Repeat from * to * all the way around the hexagon. DC 1, slip stitch to the top of the chain-2. (6 DC per side).

6. Chain 2, *DC 4, then work [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain space of the previous round*. Repeat from * to * all the way around the hexagon. DC 2, slip stitch to the top of the chain-2. (8 DC per side).

7. Chain 2, *DC 5, then work [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain space of the previous round*. Repeat from * to * all the way around the hexagon. DC 3, slip stitch to the top of the chain-2. (10 DC per side).

8. Chain 2, *DC 6, then work [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain space of the previous round*. Repeat from * to * all the way around the hexagon. DC 4, slip stitch to the top of the chain-2. (12 DC per side).

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Related: Chevron Baby Blanket Free Pattern

Half Hexagons:

Make 4 in Color B (Turquoise) and 4 in Color C (White)

1. Start with a magic loop and secure it with a slip stitch.

2. Chain 2. Work 1 DC into the magic loop. Chain 2 again. Your first chain 2 counts as a DC.

3. * DC 2, chain 2* twice more into the magic loop. Pull the tail ends to close the loop. You should have 3 sets of DC and 2 chain-2 spaces now.

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4. Chain 2, turn, DC 1 into the same space. DC 1 into the next and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain 2 space. Then, DC into all the DCs of the previous round and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the ch-2 spaces. DC 2, increase. (4 DCs per side)

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Don’t worry if the edge doesn’t seem completely straight; it’ll be blocked later.

5. Chain 2, turn. DC 1 into the same space, DC  2 and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain 2 space. Then, DC into all the DCs of the previous round and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the next ch 2 space. DC 4, increase. (6 DCs per side)

6. Chain 2, turn. DC 1 into the same space, DC  3 and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain 2 space. Then, DC into all the DCs of the previous round and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the next ch 2 space. DC 6, increase. (8 DCs per side)

7. Chain 2, turn. DC 1 into the same space, DC  4 and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain 2 space. Then, DC into all the DCs of the previous round and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the next ch 2 space. DC 8, increase (10 DCs per side)

8. Chain 2, turn. DC  5 and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the chain 2 space. Then, DC into all the DCs of the previous round and [DC, ch 2, DC] into the next ch 2 space. DC until the end. (12 DCs on full side)

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Seaming It All Together

Once you have all of the pieces, it’s time to arrange them in the pattern you want and sew it all together. For my blanket, this is the pattern I followed.

Gray, turquoise, white, gray, turquoise, white, gray

Turquoise (half), white, gray, turquoise, white, gray, turquoise, white (half)

Repeat these rows three more times to finish. Then, thread your tapestry needle with a long length of yarn and use the invisible seam method to attach each hexagon to the one next to it. If you don’t know how to seam pieces together, take a look at this tutorial. I found it really helpful and it’s a short lesson.

hexagon-baby-blanket-hexes

Also, the best way to sew all these hexagons together is to work each row first, then sew the rows together. So for the first row, seam together the touching sides of each hexagon to the one next to it. Do this for each row. Then, seam each row to the next in a zig zag. It does take a while to do, but it’s easy and you just need to spend some time on it. I hate seaming, but the effect is so nice that I really do think it’s worth it! Don’t worry about the tails; as long as they don’t show on the front, they’ll either be covered by the fleece or worked into the border.

Blocking, Adding Fleece, and the Border

For me, the best part of this hexagon baby blanket (and most of the baby blankets I make) is the fleece lining. It adds weight to the blanket and stays on the baby when they move around, and it has a comforting presence. It also makes the blanket much softer and warmer, which is perfect for a blanket. However, if you don’t want to add the fleece, you can go ahead and skip to the section on adding the border.

First, blocking.

Before adding the fleece, lightly block the blanket so that all the hexagons are as they should be. They might have gotten a little out of shape if you sewed them too tightly together or a little unevenly. But a simple blocking will fix that and make sure that two of the edges are straight.

hexagon-baby-blanket-blocking

Prepping the fleece

On a large surface (like the kitchen table or the living room floor), lay out your fleece and smoothe it out. Then, lay our your blanket on top of it, matching up two of the edges. Smoothe it out and make sure it all lines up. I find this way of measuring the fleece to the blanket much easier than taking measurements and cutting according. It helps me see the finished product better. Using a pair of sharp scissors, cut the fleece to the size of the blanket. Make sure to work close to the actual shape of the blanket (like around the peaks) without cutting the yarn!

Remove the blanket for now and let’s just work with the fleece. This is where we’ll make the holes into the edges of the fleece so that we can insert our hook into it to crochet the fleece and blanket together. Put a cutting mat or a piece of cardboard under the edge of the fleece to protect your surface and bring a ruler about a quarter inch away from the edge of the fleece. Then, run your skip stitch down the side of the ruler. The skip stitch is the same as a rotary blade, but it perforates as it cuts into the fleece, rather than cutting a straight line. Work down all four sides of the fleece so that you have small slits along each side.

hexagon-baby-blanket-skip-stitches

Now let’s secure the fleece to the blanket!

Bring the blanket back to the fleece and line up the first corner. With your crochet hook, attach yarn in the border color (Color D). Work 1 SC just in the corner of the blanket. Then, SC down the side going through the spaces in the crocheted blanket and the slits made in the fleece. At the corner, ch 1, rotate the blanket and work down the next side. This round gives you the first round of your border and attaches the fleece to the blanket.

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Work one more round of SC around the blanket, making sure to ch 1 before turning the corners.

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The Bobble Border

Almost done, guys!

1. Chain 5 at the corner of the blanket.

2. Into the 2nd chain from the hook, work 1 HDC but only pull the yarn through the first two loops. You’ll have two loops remaining on the hook. Work 3 more  HDC the same way, being sure to only pull through the first two loops each time.

3. You should now have 5 loops on the hook. YO, and pull through all 5 loops.

4. Slip stitch into the same space to finish off the bobble.

5. Slip stitch twice into the next two chain spaces.

6. SC into each of the next two SC spaces. Repeat steps 1-6 all around the blanket and bind off.

Related: How to Crochet Bobbles, Step-by-Step Pictures

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And you’re done!

Weave in any loose ends and trim the excess yarn, but other than that, you’re done with the Hexagon Baby Blanket! I realize that this blanket has a lot of steps and it’s somewhat time-consuming, but the result is really special and wonderful. And it really isn’t difficult at all.

The hexagons and half hexagons work up quickly and they can be made while watching TV or listening to something, since there’s nothing too complicated about them.

Once you’ve made the hexagons, seaming them all together does take some time. More time than I expected, but it’s the only lengthy part of the process. The fleece and border work up quickly and easily.

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I absolutely love this pattern and the lady I made this for says her son LOVES his new blanket. She says he carries it around with him and holds onto the bobbles, which is exactly what I wanted. Look at him all snug and “reading” his book 😀

Hexagon Baby Blanket Rameez

Hexagon Baby Blanket Rameez

Hexagon Baby Blanket Rameez

Hexagon Baby Blanket Rameez Hexagon Baby Blanket Rameez

I hope you guys make this Hexagon Baby Blanket and that you love it as much as we do. If you’d like a condensed, printable version of this pattern, you can get it in the resource library along with other freebies like my ebook, The Beginner’s Guide to Crochet, and the Designing Your Own Patterns Workbook!

Just fill out the box below to subscribe and get access! I’ll see you all soon with another post 🙂


  • Love the fleece on the back! Pretty pattern too. Thank you for sharing on Merry Monday! Have a great week!
    Kim